" When I send documents to the recycling bin should I divide the documents by type...I mean like the way I separate my trash?"
Martin Dominique - Dallas, TX

Interesting question and one that can only be answered after an explanation of how a computer actually stores and uses bits of information. Let's take a typical Word document as an example. It has about 36 kilobytes of information with each KB being comprised of approximately 1000 bytes and each byte further divided into 8 bits. So now we see that the above Word document is actually comprised of approximately 280,000 separate bits and it is these bits that are the problem. When your computer is new and your hard drive is clean all subsequent documents created use what scientists call "virgin bits". In the process of creating a document these bits pick up a "subatomic identity format" that can "mark" a bit for up to one year. When the typical user decides to delete a document, it is sent to the recycling bin to be broken apart into a collection of bits for later use in another document. Trouble seems to occur when a new document is being created from a collection of previously used bits that retain a "subatomic identity format" that is not compatible with the new file format. It's these "tainted" bits that can cause "format interpolation" when a document is saved. So what can you do? The answer is surprisingly simple and is already practiced by millions of Americans when they take out the trash. That's right, just like your trash, your recycle bin needs to be divided by content. It is recommended that everyone should install three sub-bins under the main recycling bin identified by image, text and sound/movie file types. These are the three formats that seem to have the most difficult time with "format interpolation" when mixed with each other. You can easily create the sub-bins by going to your control panel and then double clicking the "recycle bin icon" and selecting divide/by type and simply filling in the blanks. As long as you divide the recycling you'll never have to worry about "phantom images", "ghost documents" or "format interpolation" again. Good Luck Martin!

At a glance this picture of a muscular man looks acceptable, but upon closer inspection you can clearly see the "ghost" text from the previous document format. Bits retain "subatomic format identies" and should be seperated by file type when deleting. Proper division of the recycling bin contents would have prevented this.

It is recommended that everyone should install three sub-bins under the main recycling bin identified by image, text and sound/movie file types. These are the three formats that seem to have the most difficult time with "format interpolation" when mixed with each other

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